Dating demographics

Using a combination of basic economic principles, demographics, game theory, and number crunching, Jon Birger explains America’s curiously lopsided dating and marriage market among single, college-educated, looking-for-a-partner women.Birger investigates not only the consequences of this unequal ratio of college-educated men to women on dating but also a host of other social issues.He, in turn, is baffled by her unwillingness to carry on a casual affair. “A house of prostitution on wheels” was how one judge described it at the time.

Dating and marrying across socioeconomic lines — “mixed-collar” marriages, if you will — is one possible remedy.

Bottom line: New York City women looking for a match would be better off, statistically at least, at a fireman’s bar in Staten Island than a wine bar on the Upper East Side.

The dynamics, and numbers, shift when we expand the conversation from different-sex to same-sex dating.

The imbalance has spilled over into the post-college dating scene.

According to data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, there are now 5.5 million college-educated women in the United States between the ages of 22 and 29 vs. In other words, the dating pool for straight, millennial, college graduates has four women for every three men.